Samantha Stevens Meets Mad Max

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At the end of yet another election year, one that saw high hopes largely unfulfilled, we pause, again, to take stock of libertarian prospects. Big-governmentdevotees, Left and Right, have collaborated on a horror movie to scare mainstream voters away from libertarian ideas. They’ve given us a hockey mask and a chainsaw, and every time we manage to resurrect ourselves from the bloody doom to which they would send us, they try to make us even scareder.

It’s time we turned off the projector, turned on the lights, and introduced the public to reality. Here are some ideas it might benefit us to get across to undecided voters in future election years. It is by no means an exhaustive list. I welcome any more items that readers may think of.

People are always being warned about the mighty power libertarians would wield if voted into office, but no libertarian elected to office comes equipped with a magic wand. We can’t really cast a spell or wiggle our noses like Samantha Stevens on Bewitched and automatically implement our will. We bring certain ideas to the table that might not be considered otherwise. Those ideas would still need to be approved and tested. Those who oppose us are at least as likely to fear that our ideas would work as to fear they wouldn’t.

Many of the predictions we hear about what libertarians want to do are merely bad science fiction. The apocalyptic, Mad Max world we’d supposedly make is the product of fevered imaginations. Our concepts could scarcely make the world more apocalyptic than the one statists have made.

Libertarian principles are very basic. It is perfectly all right for one libertarian not to agree with every other about every issue faced by humankind. What we all share is the conviction that violence should not be used to settle political disagreements. That government uses violence to get its way is certainly not just science fiction. It is evident from the news of every day. So why are we the ones who are called crazy? And after all, why must violence be used to implement citizens’ desires?

People habitually treat their fellow citizens in ways they hate being treated themselves. This is what has torn our populace asunder. What we have now is two predominant sides that can’t trust each other because each is determined to use government-backed violence against the other in an insane buildup of power — the political equivalent of a nuclear Cold War. This is mutually assured destruction, and it’s given us a mad, mad, mad, mad world.

What libertarians share is the conviction that violence should not be used to settle political disagreements. So why are we the ones who are called crazy?

Most people fear drugs worse than they do delusions. Hallucinogenic substances are not generally good for us, but popular delusions have done immeasurably greater harm. And drug legalization is not the same as drug use. I’m a recovering alcoholic who hasn’t had a drink in years. I need no reinstatement of the Volstead Act to keep me dry; I stay sober for the same reason I don’t use recreational drugs: because, not caring a damn what the government says about it one way or another, I simply choose not to.

Decriminalizing recreational drug use, and making drugs legal for sale, would put dealers, gangs, and cartels out of business. Instead of having to defend the fact that somebody, somewhere, might want to use drugs, what we ought to ask is, Why do those who make war on drugs want to keep making criminal scumballs rich?

The reason statists make war on recreational drugs is that they want a corner on the market. The most popular hallucinogenic today — that which induces the delusion of omnipotence via the power of government — can withstand no competition.

Violence actually discredits people’s beliefs. It prevents persuasion because it shuts down debate. Suppressing things — whether behaviors, substances, or ideas — does not make them go away. The good ones will survive because they’re worthy of survival, however embattled and driven underground they may be. But the bad ones are given a lease on life they do not deserve and, if left to their own devices, could never sustain.

Why are so many avowedly fervent Christians, in particular, so dead set against libertarianism? Our philosophy is based on the Golden Rule. If the zealots on the social Right ever tire of combing through the Old Testament Holiness Code for rules to force on those they dislike, they might try reading the Gospels for a change. That those who follow Christ are supposed to do unto others as they would have them do unto them was enjoined by none other than the Man Himself. If this were truly a Christian nation, one would think this would be the political philosophy by which it would operate.

In truth, statists don’t dare do unto others as they would have done unto them. Their ideas do not stand up under scrutiny, and much less in practice. They need to implement and maintain their notions by force, because such schemes would not survive in any other way. There’s a reason why they tend to see life as a horror movie. By their policies, they’ve managed to turn a cheesy and utterly unbelievable script into an everyday reality.




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The Dangers of Diagnosis

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“Nearly 1 in 5 Americans had mental illness in 2009.” This recent CNBC online headline captured my attention.

The brief article that followed was based on a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a federal agency (oas.samhsa.gov). The article repeats highlights from the agency’s report entitled “Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings,” available in PDF form.

The article states that an estimated 45 million US residents had a mental illness, and 11 million had a serious mental illness, and that these numbers reflect increasing depression among the unemployed.

The article’s intention — to create alarm — is loosely veiled. If people do not have access to interventionist and preventive treatment, any number of woes can follow: “disability, substance abuse, suicide, lost productivity and family discord.” Lost employment equals lost health insurance equals a lack of access to treatment equals a crisis. The insinuation is that government should step in to close the treatment gap.

Finding this article was fortuitous. Only days before I had read an article in Skeptic magazine about the “foibles of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual V” — the diagnostic guide for mental health practitioners. (For details, see “Prognosis Negative” in Skeptic, volume 15, number 3 [2010], by John Sorboro, himself a licensed, practicing psychiatrist.)

The state of the psychiatric arts today, complicated by increased government control over our nation’s healthcare industry, should alarm all citizens, not just libertarians.

According to Dr. Sorboro, the upcoming version of the DSM will have a marked increase in diagnosable psychiatric disorders, which may include “compulsive shopping” and “Post Traumatic Embitterment Disorder.” But the problem with the DSM has to do with the validity of what it says.

To rectify the unscientific nature of prior versions of the work, the third version was intended to “increase reliability by standardizing definitions.” Still, critics maintained that “the rhetoric of science — rather than scientific data — was used by the developers of the DSM-III to promote their goal, and science did not support [their] claims.” In 1994, the DSM-IV was published, listing 297 disorders. The latest revision is set to increase that list. Yet according to Dr. Sorboro, almost “every major psychiatric construct is seen as being of questionable validity by a vocal group within the field itself[,] or outside it.”

Psychiatric disorders are supposed to be pathological constructs, as Parkinson’s disease is a pathological construct. For a construct to be valid, Sorboro states, it must differentiate itself from other pathological constructs and provide a theoretical framework for prediction and specific intervention. He likens psychiatric pathological constructs to the construct for fibromyalgia — “a loose collection of non-specific complaints.” Fibromyalgia lacks an underlying, identifiable pathology. So do psychiatric constructs.

Critiques of the DSM include claims that it’s a collection of “the moral objections of a group within power [who] desire to medically pathologize another group for self serving purposes,” and that it is “a-theoretical and purely descriptive.” Evidence in support of the former critique is that homosexuality was not entirely removed from the DSM’s list of mental disorders until the latter half of the 1980s!

A diagnosis based on the DSM is not a divination of pathology. The DSM is tautological. It describes. It does not explain. Thus, diagnosis is subjective, not objective. Sorboro uses bipolar disorders to illustrate. Bipolar I disorder appeared in the DSM-III in 1980, followed by Bipolar II Disorder, Bipolar Disorder NOS (not otherwise specified — that’s worrisome), and cyclothymia. There has been a correlative rise in the diagnoses of such disorders — one statistic that Sorboro cites is a 4000% increase in bipolar disorder diagnoses in children during the past decade, despite the fact that mental health practitioners know “hardly anything more of real scientific significance about bipolar disorder than we did in 1980.”

Soboro states that medical disease classification evolves in a messy and inconsistent way, “and often has to do with politics and not just compelling scientific fact. It’s just much worse in psychiatry.” For example, contributors to the DSM-V include “health care consumers”; and as Sorboro says, no other branch of medicine would ask consumers for advice in defining pathology. Moreover, the American Psychiatric Association taskforce handling this revision is conspicuously closed and non-transparent — task force members must sign confidentiality agreements and cannot keep written notes of their meetings.

Hmm.

I have been skeptical of the DSM since I first read it. I was a judicial clerk, and my judge kept a copy of the DSM-IV on one of his bookshelves. He used it for reference during sentencing hearings and when he presided over mental health hearings. During lulls in my clerkship tasks, I read several large chunks of the DSM-IV. My initial thoughts were: there certainly are some people with severe mental problems, but this is bullshit. Symptoms of the indicated mental “conditions” were so encompassing that anyone and everyone could be classified as having some type of mental disorder.

My best friend from high school is a psychiatrist, and after reading the DSM-IV, I asked her about it. She said that it gives a practitioner guidelines for diagnoses. But don’t guidelines have to guide? I asked. Isn't a diagnostic process that has no conceptual limits wholly subjective? The flu is marked by symptoms that make it the flu and not a common cold or pneumonia. But even a brief reading of the DSM shows that mental illnesses are not marked by unique symptoms. Why? My friend had a few forgettable justifications, but no answers.

Homosexuality was not entirely removed from the DSM’s list of mental disorders until the latter half of the 1980s!

Many Liberty readers are familiar with libertarian criticisms of the mental health industry. But the state of the psychiatric arts today, complicated by increased government control over our nation’s healthcare industry, should alarm all citizens, not just libertarians. Psychiatric abuse by states against citizens is well documented; psychiatric imprisonment for dissidents in the Soviet Union is just one example.

The dangers are clear. In the legal realm, when a criminal statute is overbroad, behavior otherwise constitutionally protected is criminalized, subjecting more citizens to state control. Overdiagnosis of overinclusive mental disorders will subject more citizens to treatment — which, under Obamacare, means subjection to more government control. This should be enough to give anyone an anxiety disorder. Considering the political nature of mental “disease” classification, I wonder if a disorder marked by “irrational fear” of a “benevolent government” might be among the disorders included in the new DSM.




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