Full Mental Jacket

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When this essay is published, it may not pertain to the current news. But if it doesn’t, it soon will. Some deranged gunman shoots a bunch of people every couple of weeks.

Every time this happens, public reaction is predictable. On the political left, a clamor is raised to do something — anything! — about gun violence; while on the right, we are reminded that guns don’t float around causing mayhem without people attached to them, so people must be blamed.

While I often disagree with conservatives, on this issue I’m in complete accord. Let me make that clear from the start. I would never advocate the confiscation of weapons, because I have a small arsenal of my own. I would not feel safe without it, and yes, every firearm I have, I’ve taken the effort to learn how to use.

Gun control is so unpopular, with a wide swathe of the population, that gun-grabbers must proceed with caution. Even some hardcore leftists own guns, and would be loath to give them up. Thus must those who want to take them away press for legislation that achieves their purpose incrementally. They operate by stealth.

They’re so much saner than the rest of us, don’t you know, that our fitness to defend ourselves, our families and our homes is supposedly best left up to them.

Their new favorite tactic is advocating that mentally ill people be banned from owning guns. I see one problem with this, and it’s big enough to drive a fleet of trucks through. Precisely who gets to determine who’s too crazy to have a gun and who isn’t?

We can be pretty sure that leftist authoritarians envision themselves in the judgment seat in this matter, as in so many others. They’re so much saner than the rest of us, don’t you know, that our fitness to defend ourselves, our families and our homes is supposedly best left up to them. The same people who are chewing their brains into wads trying to decide whether Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders should be president see themselves (and Hillary or Bernie) as the arbiters about who is protected or not protected by the Second Amendment. Or if it protects anyone at all.

It may seem indelicate of me to suggest that such people might be influenced by political considerations, that they’re likely to claim that libertarians and conservatives — who are, indeed, the most likely to own firearms — are all psychologically unfit to be let loose with deadly weapons. Far be it for me to say that. Even though — for all their protests of concern for the rights of the marginalized — most “progressives” show very little interest in protecting the rights of the mentally ill. Nut-bashing has been such a huge part of their offensive for so many years that they have been slow to get on board with any movement to speak out on their behalf.

Once the people with pretty hair in the big-corporate media — the stars of rap and sports and motion pictures — begin telling the public how cool it is to care about some marginalized group, the little minions usually follow with enthusiasm. That tendency isn’t gaining much momentum yet on this cause — probably because they aren’t through marginalizing the mentally ill, either now or at any time in the foreseeable future.

Progressives want everyone to depend on the protection afforded by police, even as cops across the country are making war against the citizenry.

Especially contemptible has been the treatment the left-leaning media has given prominent libertarians and conservatives, such as Glenn Beck, whose pasts include mental health issues. Though they’re fond of issuing “trigger warnings” about a plethora of other sensitive concerns, they gleefully take sticks to their favorite piñatas, proclaiming them “whacko” or “a few bricks short of a load.” Now they dream of doing more than shaming and stigmatizing anybody who refuses to march in lockstep with their advance to power. They want to render them utterly defenseless.

“Progressives” want everyone to depend on the protection afforded by police, even as cops across the country are making war against the citizenry. The very people we’re paying to protect us are often engaged in brutalizing us (and not just people of color, but whites as well). Those suffering from mental disorders are muchmore likely than the general population to be roughed up, or even killed, by the police. So much for the statist left’s supposed concern for the vulnerable.

It’s hard to believe that this outrage against guns is motivated by merely the usual arrogance of authoritarians on the left. I suspect that, indeed, they want everybody disarmed for a reason. But of course when I tell them this, they reply that I’m a typical nutty libertarian.

I don’t care that they think they’re smarter than everybody else. Nor do I have any reason to trust that they’re saner. If they think I’m going to surrender my guns, they are themselves several crab puffs shy of a pu-pu platter.




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Legal Predation

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Alabama has not escaped an abuse suffered elsewhere in the country, one reminiscent of lawyers’ trolling for plaintiffs in their nightly TV ads. The Opelika-Auburn News has carried stories about a form letter (copied online by the newspaper) that local businesses have received from a law firm in Montgomery. (I have also had a brief conversation with an attorney for some of the victims.)

The letter threatens a federal lawsuit on behalf of not-yet-specified plaintiffs for not-yet-specified violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act unless the targeted firm agrees to an out-of-court settlement. The letter expressly says that a suitable settlement would cover legal fees. The amount later suggested, typically a few thousand dollars, apparently turns out to be small enough to persuade some victims to settle to avoid risking further and possibly great expense and trouble.

Such predation is one more example of using or threatening government power to redistribute wealth away from its real producers. It is also an example both of quasi-deception and of regarding business firms as fair game that just exists, almost automatically, to be exploited in various ways as might occur to somebody.




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Observations on a Leaking “Social”

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In a recent piece I had a bit of fun with the notice that the Social Security Administration (SSA) had purchased 174,000 rounds of hollow-point .357 caliber ammo, which the SSA later said was for “target practice.” I speculated that the SSA was gunning up to gut-shoot granny when she comes to complain about her benefits being cut, owing to America’s spending and (lack of saving) problem.

Two recent reports provide an interesting new take on the story.

The first conveys the news — totally ignored in the mainstream media — that this year marks a record high for Social Security retirement and Social Security disability benefits paid out. And the fiscal year has a month left to go!

In Fiscal Year 2011 (which ended September 30 of that year), the feds shelled out a record sum: nearly $592 billion in benefits (from the Old Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund). But as of the end of last month, they had already spent about $3 billion more than that — $595 billion in total so far in FY 2012.

Again, in FY 2011, the SSA paid out $128 billion in disability benefits. As of last month, it had paid already paid $129 billion for FY 2012.

As of now, there are a record 45,505,287 retirees or survivors receiving regular Social Security payments, and an additional 10,786,510 workers or their dependents on Social Security Disability. And the wave of retiring baby boomers is just getting underway.

Then there is the fascinating story out of Louisiana of a dude who was denied emergency food stamps. This citizen — one Mark Knight — allegedly returned to his truck and pulled out his handy AR-15 “assault” rifle, apparently to petition for redress of grievances. He was nabbed by national guardsmen before he could use it.

All this conjures up the vision of granny herself gunning up with an assault rifle . . . against SSA agents with .357 magnums . . . not really a fair fight.

My suggestion: the SSA needs to bring in tanks, with hollow-point ammo for the .50-caliber machine guns. This will help the citizenry achieve true moral clarity.




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Eight Million Regulations

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There is a classic film noir called The Naked City (1948). The film’s plot is the investigation of a murder, and the story takes place in New York City. At the end of the flick, a narrator intones a famous line: “There are eight million stories in the naked city. This has been one of them.”

Reading a recent report on the latest regulations laid down by the Justice Department for compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, I thought of a new take on that line: “There are eight million regulations in the Obama state. This is just another flock of them.”

In an effort to ensure perfect “fairness” for all the “disabled,” the feds now dictate the following.

  • Amusement parks must provide at least one seat for the wheelchair-bound on any new or altered ride.
  • Miniature golf courses must make at least half of the holes “accessible,” defined as having a surrounding ground space that is “48 inches minimum by 60 inches minimum with slopes not steeper than 1:48 at the start of play.”
  • Regular golf courses must now have “an accessible route to connect all accessible elements within the boundary,” and must also “connect golf cart rental areas, bag drop areas, teeing grounds, putting greens, and weather shelters.”
  • Gyms must now position at least one of each type of exercise machine so that it is accessible to the wheelchair-bound.
  • Saunas must now provide accessible turning spaces and an accessible bench.
  • Shooting ranges must now provide accessible turning spaces “for each different type of firing position.”

My favorite is this one: all public accommodations must allow miniature horses as guide animals, because some handicapped people have moral or religious problems with dogs.

The good news is that the feds rule out full-size horses. Why, I don’t know — couldn’t some handicapped people have moral or religious problems with both dogs and miniature horses?

The miniature horse rule brings to mind another line I remember from the past: Frank Zappa’s song about Montana — “Just me and the pygmy pony, over the dental floss bush.”




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Individualism in Real Life

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Bethany Hamilton is one of those perfect libertarian heroes. When she wants something, she goes after it. When things go wrong, she looks for a way to make it right. She doesn't whine or complain, even when the thing that goes wrong is the horror of a shark taking off her arm. She relies on herself, her family, and her God.

The movie about Bethany, Soul Surfer, has its predictably maudlin moments, fueled by Marco Beltrami's heavily emotional musical score, but don't let that put you off. If you are looking for a film to demonstrate libertarian principles to your friends, take them to Soul Surfer.

The film is based on the true story of Bethany, a competitive surfer with corporate sponsorship who was on her way to professional status when a huge shark bit off her arm. She returned to competitive surfing within a matter of months, and is now a professional surfer. She also seems to be a really nice girl. I learned that not only from the film, but also from the articles I have read about her.

And the Hamiltons seem to be a model libertarian family. They ignored traditional middle-class expectations in order to follow the dreams they made for themselves. All of them, parents and children alike, live to surf. When Bethany showed a great aptitude for surfing, her parents opted out of the government school system and educated her at home so she could take advantage of daytime surfing. After her injury, they did for her only the things she absolutely could not do for herself, encouraging her quickly to find new ways of managing her "ADLs" (activities of daily living).

The film portrays the Hamiltons (Dennis Quaid and Helen Hunt, parents) as a close-knit family within a close-knit community of surfers who understand the true nature of competition. True competition isn't cutthroat or unfair. In fact, unfettered competition has the power to make every person and every product better. Even Bethany's surfing nemesis, Malina Birch (Sonya Balmores), is portrayed as competitively solid. After she paddles full out toward a wave during a competition instead of kindly slowing down to allow for Bethany's injury, Bethany (AnnaSophia Robb) thanks Malina for treating her as an equal and pushing her to be her best. It's a great example of the good that competition can accomplish.

Instead of turning to government support groups to help her deal with her injury, Bethany turns to three free-market sources: family, business, and religion. When she returns to surfing, she rejects the judges' offer to give her a head start paddling past the surf. Instead, her father designs a handle to help her "deck dive" under the waves. When finances are a problem, a news magazine offers to provide her with a prosthetic arm in exchange for a story, and a surfboard manufacturer sponsors her with equipment and clothing. The youth leader at her church (Carrie Underwood) gives her a fuller perspective on her life by taking her on a service mission to Thailand after the tsunami that hit in 2004. There she learns the joy of serving others — a kind of work that earns her psychic benefits rather than monetary rewards. She isn't "giving back"; she is "taking" happiness.

These examples of self-reliance and nongovernmental solutions to problems raise the level of this emotionally predictable film to one that is philosophically satisfying — and well worth seeing.


Editor's Note: Review of "Soul Surfer," directed by Sean McNamara. Sony Pictures Entertainment, 2011, 106 minutes.



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Another Busted Safety Net

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I like to reflect upon the news about our vaunted safety net pension plans — the crowning jewels of our progressive paradise — as they head off a fiscal cliff. The latest report concerns a rather neglected jewel, the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, created in 1957 during the Eisenhower presidency.

Under this perhaps well-intended program — assuming that any social program is truly well-intended, a dubious assumption, indeed — workers of any age who become disabled or unable to work because of health issues receive federal support. The idea is that all workers pay a small amount into the SSDI fund, so that the few workers stricken by health issues derive a small but reasonable stipend (on average, about $1,100 a month).

Well, the SSDI will have the dubious honor of being the first federal support program to go bust. It will likely run out of funds in four to seven years — which probably means four years. At that point, it will become a pure negative — an explicit draw on tax dollars collected by the feds from hapless taxpayers.

I can hear readers ululating dolorously, “Why? Why? Why?” The reason is this: during the last decade, there has been an explosion of disabled people. In the year 2000, there were 6.6 million people in the program—a remarkable number in itself. But by last year that number had swelled to 10.2 million, an increase of 55%.

That’s the nationwide figure. In a number of states, however, the rate of increase in disability recipients has been even higher. Examples are New Hampshire at 69% and Texas at 85%. But at the top of the list is Puerto Rico. It has nine of the top ten American zip codes for receiving SSDI disability checks. And it has the highest approval rate (63%!) for disability claims. It would appear that there is a large amount of abuse going on in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. As Ivan Gonzalez-Cancel, a local surgeon who is planning on running for governor in 2012, has put it, “The mentality is that it’s ‘big, rich, Uncle Sam’s money.’ ”

The consequence of the explosion of eligibility is that the SSDI program went negative in 2005, and by 2015, the earliest but most likely date, it will be spending $22 billion more in benefits than it takes in. At that point, all of its “reserves” will likely have been exhausted.

Naturally, the program’s advocates have a ready cure: raise SSDI taxes, or hide the deficit in the regular Social Security fund. Of course, what to do when the regular Social Security fund goes bust, they don’t say.




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